Archetype

Picture of Archetype

Dawning

©2002 Self-Released
1. Final Day
2. Hands Of Time
3. Dawning
4. Dissension's Wake
5. Inside Your Dreams
6. Premonitions
7. Visionary
8. Arisen
9. The Mind's Eye
10. Years Ago

Despite being fairly predictable and thus, automatically unnecessary, I somewhat like this release by Archetype. The band, a four piece from Ohio, plays a brand of metal obviously inspired by 80s heroes. And we all know exactly how saturated this market currently is. If one were to walk through a field of musicians, eight of out ten you kick in the noggin will be a "prog/power" metal dude. Archetype so happens to have a guitar sound that reminds me of Helloween circa 1987 and a singer who probably could audition for Iced Earth and succeed the next time Jon Schaffer decides to boot half the band. Their songs employ many of the standard methods for being "prog" and "power" in metal, so you pretty much know what you're getting beforehand. Fortunately, there are a couple things that help Archetype not sound like another limp, dreadful Gamma Ray clone. First off, the guitars, while often dwelling in late 80s methology, occasionally drift into some nifty noodling and clean breaks that help move the songs along better. Second, the drummer thankfully doesn't mindlessly rumble away on double bass rolls and actually provides some decent rhythms.

Granted, my tolerance for anything remotely involved in "power" metal is extremely low. Too many weak clones and imitators over the past few years have caused my power metal pancreas to stop secreting insulin to digest most of that sugary, fatty stuff. While there are times I find myself shaking my fist at Dawning, there are enough moments that pull them from the morass to suggest if this band chooses, they could set themselves apart from the rest of the scene. The splashes of creativity and original songwriting on Dawning hint that this band has a lot of potential. And if you happen to be a huge fan of this style, Archetype will most likely do you no wrong whatsoever.

Review by Matthew Braymiller

Review date: 08/2002

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