Balance Of Power


Book Of Secrets

Balance Of Power - Book Of Secrets ©1998 Point Music
1. Desert Of Lost Souls
2. Walking On Top Of The World
3. Book Of Secrets
4. When Heaven Calls Your Name
5. It's Not Over
6. Do You Dream Of Angels
7. Seven Days Into Nevermore
8. Miracles And Dreams
9. Stranger Days (To Come)

Wow, where do I begin? Balance of Power are one of those bands that defy typification. I can call them AOR and people will nod their heads. I can call them progressive metal and people will nod their heads. I can call them overblown, bombastic, power metal and people will nod their heads. Let's just call them fantastic before everyone gets dizzy from all this nodding.

The music is technical and heavy, fueled by a twin guitar attack, backed by the keys. The vocals are involved and delivered superbly. The drumming is outstanding. The song writing is fantastic. Book Of Secrets is a concept album loosely based on the Bible Code book from just a little while back. The lyrics are upbeat and positive, though not terribly deep or philosophical. But they are also plentiful, making for some involved vocal melodies. Singer Lance King really belts out the lyrics with passion and energy. His singing meshes well with the musical pyrotechnics supplied by the rest of the band. The vocal harmonies are really well done. The layering of the singing approaches that of Shadow Gallery. But it isn't just the great singing that makes Balance of Power such and enjoyable listen. There are some spectacular shreds and great chops on the disc making it a real treat all the way around. The guitar leads never once get out of hand or detract from the song. The songs are all longer than average allowing for some technical playing and there is not a bad track on the disc. This is really big music that makes for some very enjoyable listening.

Fans of Vanden Plas, Ivory Tower, Crimson Glory, Dream Theater and Queensryche (or of Queensryche's potential) will love this disc.

Review by Matthew Braymiller

Review date: 09/2000

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Ten More Tales Of Grand Illusion

Balance Of Power - Ten More Tales Of Grand Illusion ©1999 Massacre Records
1. Desert Of Lost Souls
2. Walking On Top Of The World
3. Book Of Secrets
4. When Heaven Calls Your Name
5. It's Not Over
6. Do You Dream Of Angels
7. Seven Days Into Nevermore
8. Miracles And Dreams
9. Stranger Days (To Come)

Ten More Tales of Grand Illusion is the third disc from Balance of Power.

[Short Review:] It is heavy progressive AOR done right.

[Longer Review:] This disc exceeds Book of Secrets on many levels, going far beyond the boundaries marked out by what was a great disc. This disc is a tremendous disc of heavy album oriented rock, what I used to call arena rock from bands like Axe, Def Leopard and Scorpions. But the music is much bigger than that offered by those three stalwarts of power pop.

Hints of Vanden Plas and Shadow Gallery are present in this disc which features some of the best vocal harmonies you'll find outside of a King's X disc. The singing is incredible, huge, multi-layered. The choruses are huge and catchy. This is a sing-along while flying down the local highway with the volume cranked to just a hair below the point where it does physical damage to your car or eardrums sort of disc. However, it is more than a pyrotechnic display of vocal acrobatics, as appealing as that may be to fans of Shadow Gallery.

The music is technical and atmospheric. There are chops galore and the drumming is top notch. The lead guitar swirls and shreds happy circles around you all the while supporting and carrying the song forward. This is not the a slapdash amalgamation of sound to support a strutting guitar demigod. The leads never lose sight of the songs and stay well within the bounds of decency during their moments in the spotlight. The keys back the music, rarely coming to the fore, content rather to add depth and atmosphere to a rich and textured sound that will appeal to any fan of progressive heavy metal.

This disc gets added to my short list of must have progressive metal discs.

Review by Matthew Braymiller

Review date: 09/2000

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