Believer


Sanity Obscure

Believer - Sanity Obscure ©1990 Roadrunner
1. Sanity Obscure
2. Wisdom's Call
3. Nonpoint
4. Idols Of Ignorance
5. Stop The Madness
6. Dies Irae (Day Of Wrath)
7. Dust To Dust
8. Like A Song

Christian thrash music. But wait! this is pretty good stuff, great even. Exceptionally technical with those Chris Barnes-on-helium type of thrash vocals make me think Kreator, while the angelic female vocals and neo-classical instrumentation make me think The Corrs. Such dichotomies are often recipes for disaster, but Believer pull it off mainly because 90% of the album is still just pretty typical technical thrash. Comparisons to Cynic and Atheist (oh the irony) arise, but Believer is simply a band brimming with such ambition that it's preposterous, and might I add, the swirling symphonic thrash of "Dies Irae" establishes a plateau which few have had the courage to strive for and even fewer have attained. Biblical odes and such are the norm and the band's religious affiliations aren't exactly subtle (is that so different from Deicide?) but I'll not allow you to hold it against this band. This is thrash metal of the highest order and class, and could effortlessly hold it's weight in a blind sonic test to any number of heathen metalheads. In fact, "Like a Song", a prodigious cover of the U2 track, is one of my favorite metal songs ever. So whatever convictions uphold your pillars of philosophy, Believer should turn the musical trick for you.

Review by Lee Steadham

Review date: 12/1998

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Dimensions

Believer - Dimensions ©1993 Roadrunner
1. Gone
2. Future Mind
3. Dimentia
4. What Is But Cannot Be
5. Singularity
6. No Apologies
7. Trilogy Of Knowledge

It would be plain lazy of me to call Dimensions one of the best records I've ever heard in my almost-a-quarter-of-a-century existence. It would be a gross understatement to say what a profound artistic statement "The Trilogy of Knowledge" really is. Fact is, I have never met another human being who listened to this album that did not feel the same way I do. Yeah, they're Christian, but who cares? Christian-shmristian. There is an undeniable greatness about Dimensions commencing in the mostly tech-thrash front half, with "Dimentia" dressed in acoustic guitars and violin, subtly imploring you to 'sit down, shut up, and listen', structured as sort of an appetizer for the complete immersion into neo-classical/symphonic metal which "The Birth" ushers about. Extended hyperbole is useless, just know this music is an experience you have never heard, nor will you ever hear again. Is that clear enough for you?

Review by Lee Steadham

Review date: 03/1999


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