Elegy

Picture of Elegy

Labyrinth Of Dreams

Elegy - Labyrinth Of Dreams ©1992 T&T
1. The Grand Change
2. I'm No Fool
3. Take My Love
4. All Systems Go
5. Trouble In Paradise
6. Over And Out
7. Labyrinth Of Dreams
8. Mass Hysteria
9. Powergames
10. The Guiding Light

Elegy are one of the longer lived power progressive power metal bands around with quite an extensive discography. They have survived in spite of personnel changes and a shift in their sound that might have undone lesser bands.

Labyrinth Of Dreams is a solid debut, showing a technical band capable of some very intricate song writing. Early Elegy sounds a lot like early Helloween or later Eldritch. Labyrinth Of Dreams is driven by a dual guitar and keyboard attack making for a lot of layers in the music. Eduard Hovinga adds clean vocals if a bit high pitched on this disc. For those who enjoy guitar rich progressive metal, Elegy is a wonderful find. There are chops and shreds aplenty with lots of added frills throughout the songs. "The Guiding Light" is a breathless speed attack that shows tremendous promise for the future releases from this band. In light of their other releases, Labyrinth Of Dreams is raw and immature. It lacks the spit and polish of albums like State Of Mind and Manifestation Of Fear. However, as a first rung on the ladder, it is a very solid offering.

Review by Matthew Braymiller

Review date: 07/2000

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Supremacy

Elegy - Supremacy ©1994 T&T
1. Windows Of The World
2. Angels Grace
3. Poisoned Hearts
4. Lust For Life
5. Anouk
6. Circles In The Sand
7. Darkest Night
8. Close Your Eyes
9. Power Games
10. Erase Me

Supremacy steps up the speed and crunch of the band. It is faster and heavier than Labyrinth of Dreams with multi-layered guitars and keyboards that drive the music forward. On this disc they added some acoustic sections and some quiet piano giving the music more depth. The whole disc feels more technical than Labyrinth of Dreams. While not as tightly woven together as State Of Mind, this disc shows a band that is moving toward defining themselves. The Dream Theater sound is being phased out little by slow in favor of something else, a sound that will be their own. The early Helloween sound is still here. The twin guitars and keyboards really carry the music forward with Eduard Hovinga's vocals soaring. This disc and Lost show why the band did an extended tour with Stratovarius, the music is of very high caliber. Stand out tracks include "Circles In The Sand", "Darkest Night", "Supremacy" and "Erase Me".

Review by Matthew Braymiller

Review date: 07/2000

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State Of Mind

Elegy - State Of Mind ©1997 T&T
1. Equinox
2. Visual Vortex
3. Trust
4. Beyond
5. Shadow Dancer
6. Aladdin's Cave
7. State Of Mind
8. Destiny Calling
9. Resurrection
10. Losers Game
11. Suppression

This album saw a big change in personnel for Elegy. On the one hand they lost their second guitarist. On the other they lost their vocalist. Either loss would be a blow to most bands. Elegy chose to replace their vocalist and proceed to release what is possibly their best album ever. To fill the shoes of Eduard Hovinga they hired Ian Parry. Parry has been compared to Ronnie James Dio on more than one occasion and it is a fairly good comparison. State Of Mind is a very mature album that is heavier and more powerful than their second and third albums were. The return to the heaviness of Labyrinth of Dreams is a welcome change. The complexity of the songs is stepped way up and the melodic blending of the sound is really something to behold. This album is melodic power metal done with polish and pizzaz. Ian Parry's voice is less stratospheric than Hovinga's and he sings in a more relaxed style. But he sings with passion and power. You can tell just by listening to him that he's having a lot of fun singing on this album. That relaxed sound adds a great element to the mix of Elegy's music. Since he wrote the lyrics and vocal melodies for most of the sings, the vocal composition is exceptionally smooth and fits the music very well. There is not a single awkward moment on this disc. Also to be noted is the guitar work of Henk Van de Laars who steps up to the plate song after song. His chops and shredding are consistently excellent making for a very enjoyable listening experience.

Review by Matthew Braymiller

Review date: 07/2000

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Manifestation Of Fear

Elegy - Manifestation Of Fear ©1998 T&T
1. Unorthodox Methods
2. Frenzy
3. Angel Without Wings
4. Savage Grace
5. Master Of Deception
6. Solitary Days (Living In An Ivory Tower)
7. Manifestation Of Fear
8. Victim Of Circumstance
9. The Forgotten
10. Redemption
11. Metamorphosis

Manifestation Of Fear is a major leap for Elegy. Elegy appeared content to churn out consistently good, technically appealing power metal. With Manifestation Of Fear, they launched a dark and moving concept album written by vocalist Ian Parry. The liner notes introduce the story by painting a grim picture of a man who leaps to his death because he cannot bear up under the load of responsibility he feels for his pregnant wife. In a moment of drunken reasoning he chooses suicide to end his perplexity. The story begins after the birth of the child. Each song presents a new turn or twist on the roller coaster of his life. It is certainly an ambitious concept for Elegy to tackle. How well did they do? In my opinion, they released a terrific album. Ian Parry's vocal performance is stellar and the band backs him with the intricate musical tapestries that have set Elegy apart from the crowd of power metal bands. Parry's singing is emotionally charged as it should be since he is the author of the story. The credits show that the music is a group effort and it really shows in the playing. The guitars scream and soar, backed by the keys and rhythm of the band as they play for all they're worth. The title track is one of those songs that keeps you punching the replay button. Every performer on this disc shines in their individual parts. The drumming, the bass, the keys and the rest are all playing at the top of their skills and pushing, constantly pushing to reach even further. Elegy has always been a technical band but this disc surprised most fans with just how technical they can be. Rather than follow the course they had charted, Elegy jumped sideways and ahead several steps to release one of the best power progressive concept discs available. Truly a wonderful experience.

Review by Matthew Braymiller

Review date: 08/2000

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Forbidden Fruit

Elegy - Forbidden Fruit ©2000 Noise
1. Icehouse
2. Force Majeur
3. Killing Time
4. Behind The Tears
5. The Great Charade
6. 'Til Eternity
7. Masquerade
8. Elegant Solution
9. I Believe
10. Forbidden Fruit

This thing that falls into today's prog/power metal category to me reminds me more of the classic metal 80s style you might have heard a decade and a half ago. This was a time when metal singers were high pitched wonders and the imagery evoked was that of leather jackets, black denim jeans and prerequisite long hair. These, of course, are all things Elegy captures in the year 2000 with their release of Forbidden Fruit.

Forbidden Fruit is a very well produced, solid album that harnesses Elegy's collective talents into one molten brew of metal. Unlike classic metal, this band actually allows their keyboard player to find a little prominence within the mix. But the main focus is still on tightly rhythmic guitar chunks, soaring vocals courtesy Ian Parry (with whom I was previously acquainted with his contributions in Ayreon), and songs that suggest a sound from long ago. As stated above, Elegy strikes me as a band who haven't noticed a lot of metal in the 90s revolved around grunting cookie monsters or shrieking corpsepainted troll-like figures. This certainly is their appeal to their fanbase, who also haven't noticed the developments of metal around them. What Forbidden Fruit offers is a taste of a finely honed group of musicians who will excite those who still prefer this style of music above all else, but there is certainly little appeal to those outside that realm.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 02/2001

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