Heir Apparent

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Graceful Inheritance

Heir Apparent - Graceful Inheritance ©1986 Hellion Records
1. Entrance
2. Another Candle
3. The Servant
4. Tear Down The Walls
5. Running From The Thunder
6. The Cloak
7. R.I.P.
8. Hands Of Destiny
9. Keeper Of The Reign
10. Dragon's Lair
11. Masters Of Invasion
12. Nightmare (faces In The Dark)
13. And...Dogro Lived On

Remember that time when the Northwest scene was chock full of progressive metal bands such as Queensrcyhe? A time before the flannel and 70's dinosaurs? No? Well, let's take a quick look back and relearn about a scene that once was. Everyone surely knows of the success Queensryche found in the early 90's, but there were other noteworthy bands of the era that built upon the same influences and sounds. Heir Apparent was one such band. On immediate listen, you'll quickly notice a great similarity to the aforementioned Queensryche. However, the two bands are closely connected by roots (needless to say, in the early days, both bands shared soundmen, Marshall Amps, and of course the influences). Heir Apparent takes a bit of more rock approach that actually is a good bookmark to the somewhat technical-ish aspects of Queensryche's Rage for Order. Naturally, hearing this album in 1998 makes it sound very dated. But if you dig going back in time and exploring some of the lesser known secrets of progressive metal, you might want to look for this.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 04/1998

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One Small Voice

Heir Apparent - One Small Voice ©1989 Metal Blade/Capitol
1. Just Imagine
2. Crossing The Border
3. Screaming
4. Alone Again
5. Cacophony Of Anger
6. The Sound Of Silence
7. We The People
8. Young Forever
9. One Small Voice
10. Decorated
11. The Fifth Season

The second (and final) album from Heir Apparent finds the band losing some of the harder edges of their debut. Though I didn't know it when I first heard this album way back in '90, part of the reason was due to the political turmoil within the band that caused guitarist Terry Gorle to be regaled to non-band status and his input buried a bit in the mix, especially when compared to demo sessions for the album. That said, there is still quite a bit of atmosphere and great songs contained here, especially in the concluding three songs. The title track, "Decorated", and "The Fifth Season" all blend together into a moody, sweeping body of work that is quite noteworthy.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 04/1998

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