Human Abstrakt

Picture of Human Abstrakt

Human Abstrakt

Human Abstrakt - Human Abstrakt ©2001 Self-Released
1. Vice
2. Selfish

Blending together metal, gothic and a very slight tinge of Industrial Lite, Human Abstrakt provides listeners with an intriguing two song demo that very quickly stirs up a little attention. The four piece for this recording puts together bass, guitar, drums and keyboards with a hoarse shouter who occasionally does a low speak-talk form of singing and it works on the whole. Human Abstrakt does not neatly fit into any one category but fans of the Dødheimsgard's 666 International or The Kovenant may find familiarity in the band's style. While not as convuluted or dizzying as Dødheimsgard or straight forward as The Kovenant, Human Abstrakt does indeed capture a mood with their music. The keyboards provide a subtle undercurrent for the rumbling guitar playing of Jason Simmons, which is a rhythmic force such as Fear Factory's guitar playing. Both of these songs are well written and performed with a production that is extremely clear for a demo recording. With any luck, this band is going to continue on and release a full length as I would enjoy hearing more of their material.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 11/2001

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Psychological Blindness

Human Abstrakt - Psychological Blindness ©2002 Self-Released
1. Dissention
2. Blind Disciples
3. Disillusionment
4. Form My Need
5. Grit
6. Numb
7. Prosperous Fools
8. Inspiration
9. Psychological Blindness

Awhile back when I heard this band's two song demo, I was intrigued by their potential. Now that Human Abstrakt has released a full length CD, I'm a little let down by where the band has gone since the demo. Psychological Blindness, a nine song affair lasting just barely a half hour, is a fairly bland release, sticking to one or two song ideas. Some may find this to be in the vein of Fear Factory (without the variance in vocals nor the keyboards) or perhaps Meshuggah (which, by the way, is not a good thing in my book). But for the most part Human Abstrakt sticks to the idea of hoarse, strained vocals, thick slabs of riffs and mild tempo swings. Unfortunately, the same formula is used on each of the nine songs. As is the case way too often with bands these days, you hear all Human Abstrakt can offer on the first song and then have to wade through eight more examples of the same before the CD is over. There are moments that might remind people of a stripped down Skrew and the singer sort of sounds like the guy from Cemetary before he got all gothy.

Before this band really starts to go anywhere with their music, they should concentrate their efforts on developing song dynamics. More releases like Psychological Blindness will undoubtedly fall flat without expanding their initial musical soundbase.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 02/2004

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