Krabathor


Orthodox

Krabathor - Orthodox ©1998 Pavement
1. Orthodox
2. Liquid
3. Shit Comes Brown
4. To Red Ones
5. Tales Of Your History
6. Touch The Sun
7. Body As A Cover
8. Parasites
9. About Death

Hardcore influenced death-thrash, lots of catchy riffs combined with moderate technicality. Krabathor aren't terribly original, though the songwriting can be said to be decent in the genre they've chosen for themselves. The vocals are run-of-the-mill death metal growls, monotonous and uninvolved at that. The rhythm guitars keep churning out infectious hooks, and I suppose have an appropriately heavy production to support them. The leads are generic developments of riff-melodies, sometimes bordering on interesting as a result of the speed of delivery. Drumming is also rather standard, with a definitive "groove" to the general beat, mixed up with everything from blast-beats to "clicky" extended double-bass. Bass is buried in the mix, not much of a surprise there. The title track is particularly thrashy and aggressive, and the best written in the entire album. There is nothing outstandingly incompetent in the level of performance throughout the CD - they manage to maintain a level of standard which does not require you to skip tracks or...destroy things. "About Death" is a close contender for song-of-the-album, with keyboards and a generally doomier feel.

I suppose taken as a whole this might prove to be a satisfying listen at times when you're feeling too energetic for something relaxing and spaced-out, but not willing to focus all attention on a music and therefore definitely not intending to put on a musical masterpiece. The music here is easily accessible, and you'll certainly "get" everything there is to hear on your first listen. Probably like, not adore, what you "get", and possibly even forget everything you heard within the hour. Recommended only if straighforward heavy thrash is the single most qualifying factor for purchasing a CD; if indeed it is, there aren't many bands better than Krabathor at making that.

Review by Rahul Joshi

Review date: 07/1999

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