Love Spirals Downwards


Idylls

Love Spirals Downwards - Idylls ©1992 Projekt
1. Illusory Me
2. Scatter January
3. Love's Labour's Lost
4. This Endris Night
5. Forgo
6. Eudaimonia
7. Dead Language
8. Stir About The Stars
9. Noumena Of Spirit
10. Ladonna Dismissa
11. Drops, Rain And Sea
12. Waiting For The Sunrise
13. And The Wood Comes Into Leaf

Released in 1992, Love Spirals Downwards had a sound that reflected a similar vibe to Lycia, with perhaps more acoustic guitar and of course Suzanne Perry's tranquil, floating voice setting them apart. Idylls is a very light, delicate album which works its way into a musical niche within the first song and sticks with it throughout the album. There isn't a ton of variety between the tracks, but as a solid package, it works well. Treated electric guitar, quiet synthetics and quite a healthy dose of acoustic guitar make up a musical soundtrack for Perry to place her voice over. Compared to other albums in the Love Spirals Downwards catalogue, this one isn't quite as realized as their other works but for a late night, peaceful listen, Idylls is an above average piece of work.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 03/2000


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Ardor

Love Spirals Downwards - Ardor ©1994 Projekt
1. Will You Fade
2. Sidhe
3. Write In Water
4. Avincenna
5. Mirrors A Still Sky
6. Subsequently
7. I Could Find It Only By Chance
8. Kykeon
9. Depression Glass
10. Sunset Bell
11. Tear Love From My Mind

I really do like this duo a lot. Easily one of the most tranquil and soothing atmospheric rock bands around, Love Spirals Downwards is one of the best late-night relaxation CDs I own. Suzanne Perry's soft and soaring voice matched with Ryan Lum's stretching synths, acoustic guitar passages and creative song bases make for a wonderful listen. This is the sort of music that can place you, as a listener, into a serious zone of calmness. Essentially the quality of music lasts throughout the album and no one song will stand out above the rest, but the consistency of excellence is pervasive throughout. The CD also features guest songwriting from Black Tape For a Blue Girl's Sam Rosenthal. Love Spirals Downwards is a recommended pick for anyone searching out expansive atmospheric music for their late nights.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 09/1999

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Ever

Love Spirals Downwards - Ever ©1996 Projekt
1. El Pedregal
2. Sideways Forest
3. Madras
4. Last Classic
5. Ipomoea
6. Delta
7. Cay At Dawn
8. Promises
9. Lieberflusse
10. Ananda
11. Above The Lone

Love Spirals Downwards plays what I call Bedtime Ambience. Their soothing, tranquil and flowing sound is the perfect sedative to mold your mood into blissful slumber. While that may read as an insult to some, it is actually a compliment to this duo's remarkable ability to create truly etherial and beautiful music. Ryan Lum, the instrumentation of the pair, creates a base that uses acoustic guitar gently strummed, drawn-out synth notes and occasional treated guitar. The effect is one of a vast eternal plane over which you glide effortlessly. Add Suzanne Perry's soft and guiding vocals and you get one excellent complete package. The entire album slides like silk over you, caressing and lulling you into a happier, better mood. You can betcha I'll be having this one on late at night often.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 01/1999

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Flux

Love Spirals Downwards - Flux ©1998 Projekt
1. City Moon
2. Alicia
3. Sound Of Waves
4. Psyche
5. Nova
6. By Your Side
7. Ring
8. I'll Always Love You
9. Sunset Bell

Listening to this album is like being submerged in tranquillity. While not necessarily being the epitome of ambient music, Love Spirals Downwards is indeed a moving experience that is quite beautiful. LSD (hmm...) is comprised of two artists: Suzanne Perry's soft enchanting vocals that are innocent and waiflike and Ryan Lum's instrumentation. The music is based on dance beats, though used more in the way Aphex Twin employs them and less intrusive. Meanwhile, synth notes seemingly hang peacefully forever as treated guitar floats right above it. In a nutshell, it is compelling and soothing simultaneously.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 12/1998

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Temporal

Love Spirals Downwards - Temporal ©2000 Projekt
1. Alicia (remix)
2. Misunderstood (I'll Always Love You Remix)
3. Ring
4. Asleep
5. Madras
6. Amarillo
7. Above The Lone
8. Subsequently (live)
9. Kykeon
10. Depression Glass
11. This Endris Night
12. Ladonna Dissima
13. Mediterrenea

Subtitled "A Collection of Music Past and Present", Temporal is a quasi-"Best Of" package for the duo of Love Spirals Downwards. But rather than culling up a handful of previously available tracks, slapping it together onto a disc and releasing it to the hungry masses, Love Spirals Downwards was kind enough to include six previously unavailable songs to give the adoring throng of fans something slightly new to chew on while waiting for a proper follow up to the excellent 1998 release, Flux.

The album works its way backwards, chronilogically speaking. Starting with reworked tracks from Flux, Temporal takes the listener on a journey backwards from their most current material to older songs. While the duo has retained a familiar sound throughout their existence, the more expansive, newer sound does contrast somewhat with their older, slightly more "traditional" acoustic guitar based offerings. Regardless, the collection does retain cohesion throughout. The unreleased tracks are either remixes, live tracks, or compilation-only recordings. The remixed tracks are from the Flux sessions and are not wildly different from the originals, but merely offer a different tangent to the musical theme of each song. The live inclusion, "Subsequently", is haunting and beautiful, quite possibly my favorite song on this entire collection.

Temporal is a successful best of collection due to the fact that it can both introduce new listeners to this duo's wonderful and beautiful music as well as give longtime fans a bonus prize for picking it up. Neither redundant or unnecessary, Temporal is much more eternal than the title suggests.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 09/2000

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