Overlord


The Wonderful World Of Chemistry

Overlord - The Wonderful World Of Chemistry ©2001 Storm Tower Records
1. Atonal
2. Populist Anthem
3. Meet The Situation Artist
4. The Germ Theory Of Thought
5. Girls Watching Boys Watching Girls
6. The 70th Love Song

My exposure to Overlord stems from a number of select live tracks and a few tracks off of their most recent album, The World Takes. I was very impressed by their brand of melancholic, reverb-heavy pop. From listening to their debut EP, one would be surprised to find that this is the same band. Not to say that this debut recording is bad by any stretch of the imagination. Quite the contrary, in fact. While Overlord, at this stage in its existence, bore a sound that was more redolent of The Beach Boys and the Apples in Stereo than the Smiths, there still existed a strong sense of songwriting, not to mention an almost-epic, wall of sound production, as the deluge of reverb-laden vocal harmonies would indicate. The album’s centerpiece, “The Germ Theory of Thought”, is a magnificent track that hints at the band’s more depressive characteristics. The same can be said about the almost-shoegazer sounding “Girls Watching Boys Watching Girls”. It is good to hear that bands such as the utterly incredible Arcade Fire and Overlord are here to give us an interesting take on old ideas. This is an interesting, all-too short EP that should be heard by all fans of good pop music.

Review by Alec A. Head

Review date: 01/2005

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The World Takes

Overlord - The World Takes ©2003 Storm Tower Records
1. Room Enough
2. Warm Body
3. A Boy In Name Only
4. The Brand New Panic
5. One And Only One
6. Human To The Corps
7. Landlubber
8. Secrets In Pair
9. Give It Up! Let It Go!
10. Stillbornagain

>No, Overlord is NOT a metal band, but they sure make some tasty pop music. A far more somber affair than its predecessor (2001's The Wonderful World of Chemistry), The World Takes is a diverse and often gorgeous collection of reverb-drenched, lo-fi pop songs. Band mastermind George Pasles, a Pennsylvania-based one-time calculus professor, has found a near-perfect balance of shoegazer rock (the Slowdive-influenced "Secrets in Pairs"), folk ("Warm Body"), Smiths-derived mope-rock ("A Boy in Name Only"), and fuzzy pop ("The Brand New Panic"). It can be said that Pasles looks to the recent past for his influences, but he is not content to straddle one artistic fence. The bevy of instrumentation and depth of emotion found on such tracks as "Landlubber" and the aforementioned "Warm Body" are worth the price of admission alone, but special mention must go the 11-minute epic "Stillbornagain". Highly recommended.

Review by Alec A. Head

Review date: 05/2005

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