Pathos


Still Life

Pathos - Still Life ©1997 Youth-Ink
1. Temptation
2. To Be
3. The Words You Want To Hear
4. Afraid
5. Drifting
6. Memory
7. Hamlet's Metamorphosis
8. Loneliest Of Times
9. Dionysians
10. My Love
11. Wide Eyed Child

James Martin, who used to play guitar in the legendary southern Arizona punk outfit Malignus Youth (trust me when I say anyone who was in the scene during their heyday will carry the Malignus flag for life), is obviously not one to rest on his laurels of his former achievements. His newest creation Pathos is a testament to that. Rather than rehash the speedcore barbershop quartet of the past, Martin has taken his music to a new level by using a thirty-seven piece orchestra in the recording of this project. Tracks like "To Be" and "Afraid" instantly conjure up favorable Beatlesque vibes from the Fab Four's later days of orchestration and experimentation. Other times, the band treads blues water and jazz (check out the melancholy "Memory" or "My Love"). There are occasional flashbacks to the Youthful past when the band revs up here and there. But the album succeeds the most when they go all out in the orchestration as they do in "Hamlet's Metamorphosis". Quite obviously this is a very literate and musically sharp group and Martin's ability to write such involved and complex music without losing the value of a good song is remarkable. If you at all care for the Beatles or want to hear some well-crafted powerful songs, you best write James and get yourself a copy.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 06/1998

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Pax

Pathos - Pax ©1999 Youth-Ink
1. Infrastructure
2. 40 Hour Life
3. In My Time
4. Someday
5. Unfocused
6. Recognition
7. Senseless
8. Peace Of Mind
9. She Wore Red
10. Fearless
11. Expense
12. Miraculous Thing
13. Timeless Day
14. Peace
15. Apples

Following up the very nicely done Still Life, James Martin & Co. continue travelling down the path of nostalgia. Pax retains much of that classic rock feel of latter day Beatles along with a touch of Queen and others on the album. The usage of an actual orchestra continues again on the album, which goes a long way in adding depth to the release. Throughout the entire listen, Pax constantly reminds me of another era. Considering their obvious influences and how well they pull it off, you'd never know Pathos is from the end of the 90s. Pax is also a much lengthier and possibly more fully realized piece of work compared to Still Life. Essentially anyone who liked Pathos' last released would do themselves right by finding this one and anyone who has a fondness for a time gone by should give this one a twirl.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 11/1999

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