Seasons Of The Wolf

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Seasons Of The Wolf

Seasons Of The Wolf - Seasons Of The Wolf ©1996 Self-Released
1. Victim Of Darkness
2. October Moon
3. Misty Shades Of Green
4. Electric Dimension
5. Long Cold Winter
6. 10,000-10,000
7. Quiet Earth

Hailing from Florida, Seasons of the Wolf are a progressive metal band in the vein of Dream Theater, Judas Priest, and that rarely mined field of keyboard/guitar based rock. While not sounding entirely like any other particular band, SOTW have the sound that does appeal to fans of power metal, progressive metal, or classic metal. Singer Wes Waddell has a strong voice that often reminds me of Rob Halford. The band tends to write music that is mid-tempo, epic length and intricate. At times, my punk-rock attention span wanes during their longer moments, but regardless it's still intriguing. My favorite track is the opener, "Victim of Darkness", where the bass guitar's circular, droning riff draws me right in.

SOTW has all the elements to become not just a good, but great band. My main criticism is reigning Wes's occasionally excessive screaming in as his singing voice is more than capable of carrying the weight of the songs.

Overall, this is a very above average release that should be checked out by anyone who considers themselves a fan of progressive or power metal.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 07/1997

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Lost In Hell

Seasons Of The Wolf - Lost In Hell ©1999 Earth Mother Music
1. Lost In Hell
2. Abandoned City
3. S.O.S.
4. Communion
5. Interstellar
6. Witchfinder
7. Voo Doo Master
8. A Face In The Mist
9. Initiation
10. Vengeance
11. One Land One King

Seasons of the Wolf, still kicking and viable in the independent metal world, have finally issued forth their follow up to their 1996 self titled release. On Lost in Hell, the band further explores their classic metal feel mixed with a more modern keyboard/atmospheric undertow. Fortunately, unlike some of those "We've got a K-mart Casio and we're gonna use it" bands, Seasons of the Wolf is able to put the keyboard bits to smart use in the songs. When the keyboards are at the forefront, they remind just a tad of Hawkwind, which of course is a very good thing indeed. Moreover, tracks like "Interstellar" utilize very attention-grabbing intros with a prog-rock type percussion attack and very serene keyboards. This song is very capable in striking a mood and carrying it all the way through the song. The latter half of the album seems to focus more on slower, moody songs which Seasons is very adept at pulling off. Lost in Hell is a band that is most obviously finding themselves as musicians. This album should be of note to anyone into older metal with a progressive cosmic arm.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 10/1999

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Nocturnal Revelation

Seasons Of The Wolf - Nocturnal Revelation ©2001 Earth Mother Music
1. New Age Revolution
2. Dead Zone
3. Quilex
4. Nocturnal Revelation
5. Dance Of A Thousand Veils
6. Liar
7. Magnetic Star
8. Skulls
9. Dark And Lonely Depths
10. Storm Of The Century
11. Starstruck
12. NR3
13. Transmission

If Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth ever wanted to take a tour off, Seasons of the Wolf's Wes Waddell would be the perfect understudy. Seasons of the Wolf is now three albums deep into their independent metal career and that's the main conclusion I've come to after listening to Nocturnal Revelation.

On their third album, Seasons of the Wolf pick up basically where the other two albums left off. The band has a style that's not quite easily pegged, although heavily steeped in classic metal as well as tinges of multiple subgenres. Their futuristic themes could place them in a category populated by the likes of Ayreon, but the two bands sound nothing alike. Probably the only identifiable and comparable element are Waddell's vocals, which seriously sound like he could step into any Overkill recording session and fool the recording engineers. To a certain degree, Seasons of the Wolf reminds me of Russia's Mental Home, another band who existed between the solidly defined conforms of metal subgenres and had a slightly unusual sound.

Overall, Seasons of the Wolf is a credible metal band that should have at least some appeal to those who like modern heavy metal influenced strongly by classic material but don't fall into the black, death or doom categories. I find myself not being totally overwhelmed by Nocturnal Revelation, but at the same time it is solid enough to recommend to fans who dig a Crimson Glory-esque take on "future metal", with one foot solidly placed in the past.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 02/2004

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Once In A Blue Moon

Seaons of the Wolf - Once In A Blue Moon ©2007 Earth Mother Music
1. Wings of Doom
2. Snaggletooth
3. Nikhedonia
4. Ghost Woman
5. In the Shadows
6. Behind the Eyes of Evil
7. The Reaper
8. Battle Scars
9. Alien Landscapes
10. The Edge of Time
11. Peace on Earth
12. Name Your Poison

Seasons of the Wolf have been chugging away for quite some time now, seemingly avoiding any of the spotlight aimed at power metal and anything firmly rooted in classic heavy metal. Once in a Blue Moon, an album three years in the making, is their fourth effort and quite possibly their best yet. During the recording process, the band found themselves without a permanent bassist or drummer, so they placed a rhythm section want ad and used some session players to lay down tracks for this album. Despite the time taken to make it, Once in a Blue Moon is a cohesive, solid piece of music.

As is now customary with any of my reviews of Seasons of the Wolf, I must point out who vocalist Wes Waddell reminds me of. Last time, it was Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth and that comparison still stands. However, this time around I'd like to submit a likeness to Udo Dirkschneider having a go at Rob Halford. With some Ellsworth mixed in. I think I'll stick with that for the time being. Anyhow, Once in a Blue Moon exists outside any notable trend in heavy metal. The band is obviously influenced by classic metal acts of yesteryear, but the good news is that they do not simply clone their influences or offer up a Gamma Ray impression as is so common with any band that could be classified as "power metal". Seasons of the Wolf utilizes a fair amount of keyboards, using them as spice and strong texture. Perhaps the best example is the instrumental "Alien Landscapes", where synthesizers and guitar intertwine quite nicely. The album has more than a few pretty solid songs, such as "Behind the Eyes of Evil".

You can rest assured that this is a satisfying heavy metal release, especially considering I don't tend to take a shine to many bands of this ilk anymore. Seasons of the Wolf has taken the slow path, but at this point they should be garnering the attention of lesser, yet more famous acts. Any old school hessian who is seeking a sophisticated updated approach to heavy metal would do themselves right by getting ahold of this album.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 05/2008

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