Slow Horse


Slow Horse

Slow Horse - Slow Horse ©1998 Freebird Records
1. Lick My Wounds
2. All Good Intentions
3. Wicked Game
4. When Are You Coming Home?
5. No One Wants You When You're Down
6. What's The Use

Much like the name implies, Slow Horse is a very trudging, heavy beast of burden, as their six song self titled album demonstrates. Falling very vaguely in the same category as Kyuss but not particularly having the desert feel or stoner rock implication, Slow Horse comes across as a very brooding band that pulls it off quite well. The song structures are somewhat based on jam sections but the band is wise never to let the vice of unfettered jamming take over the actual song, which is a very pleasant chance of pace from other "stoner" rock bands. Daniel Bukszpan's vocals sound quite enamored with heartache (and occasionally remind me of Kory Clarke from Warrior Soul) that matches the density of the music well. Most amusing perhaps is their cover of Chris Isaak's "Wicked Game", which - as expected - sounds little like the original and completely gets a Slow Horse makeover. The best way to describe this band is a Sabbath drenched, heavy rock blues band. Slow Horse has definitely released a solid, sturdy album here.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 05/2000

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Slow Horse II

Slow Horse - Slow Horse II ©2001 Beserker Records
1. I'm Nothing, I'm No One
2. The Games You Play
3. Stay
4. Let It Slide
5. Coming Unhinged
6. Nameless
7. Untitled
8. The Last
9. No. 9

Following the motif of Peter Gabriel's first few solo releases, Slow Horse's follow up to their 1998 self titled debut is also self titled. Rather than rename it for security reasons, this fine second effort will be referred to here as Slow Horse II to keep confusion at a minimum. Now put your notebooks away and pay close attention, class. Slow Horse, featuring a new lineup around band founder Dan Bukszpan, has galloped onto the heavy rock scene with one of best sophomore releases you can find. The debut was a good piece of work, but did suffer from a thin production that robbed the guitar's strength and smooshed everything into a thin, saltine cracker. This, kids, is a Ritz production job. The two new members, drummer Scott Sanfratello and bassist Ernest Anderson, must certainly be credited for helping expand and revitalize the Slow Horse sound and producer Martin Bisi may also get a gold star for beefing up the overall recording quality. The songs themselves retain the feel of loping, trudging heavy rock with a "stoner" feel, but they are given a deeper sense of dynamics and heartier arrangements. Bukszpan's singing seems much more confident and emotive throughout the album. While the tracks thunder along at old Candlemass pacing, listeners will probably never tire of the tempos as the songs contain a wallop. The arrangements allow for the songs to breathe, rather than hit one note or settle on the same groove throughout. Slow Horse's grooves are, in fact, powerful and gripping from first song to last. The melodies are often powerful and versatile, while the music provides a low end thump to your noggin.

Needless to say, I'm enjoying the heck out of Slow Horse II. The growth of the band is highly commendable and suffice to say they have a great future in front of them as one of the better groove/heavy/stoner bands I've heard. Unlike some of their peers, Slow Horse is no one-trick pony.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 12/2001

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