Throe

Picture of Throe

Throe

Throe - Throe ©1999 Self-Released
1. Psycho
2. Scream
3. Nine
4. Youth Of America
5. Born In Reverse
6. Porcelin Girl

Throe is yet another band that has apparently had Run DMC going in one ear and Metallica in the other. Featuring a fairly common sound for this moment in time, Throe offers a style that, while competently played, is in danger of severe oversaturation. I'll give the band credit for not doing too badly on this self released disc. While the production is not completely conducive to what this genre needs, you can hear what the band is trying to achieve, which is a mix between hardcore, funk, metal and a touch of rap. When the band catches a mellower, groove laden segment is when they are most effective, such as the smooth section in "Born in Reverse". I'd almost suggest the band ditch a lot of the more hardcore elements to pursue a groovier style. Throe should also realize that with the glut of bands who dream of being the next big thing in the Limp Bizkit world, there is a high demand for more originality before the genre does lose mainstream interest. Simply yelling through the harder sections and having a funky bassline won't cut it down the line. But with some interesting moments at hand on this album, Throe does have a bit of potential to grow beyond the genre limits.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 05/2000

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A Reflection Of Never

Throe - A Reflection Of Never ©2000 Throe Records
1. Aim For The Head
2. Panophobia
3. Psycho
4. Youth Of America
5. The Fallen
6. Oblivion
7. Born In Reverse
8. Scream
9. Porcelin Girl

Reprising nearly all the songs from their six song demo CD of 1999, Throe's A Reflection of Never shows the band in a better recorded form, which is only to be expected. Their approach, in case scrolling up to read the review of the demo is remarkably difficult, is a style that mixes groove laden metal riffing with rapped, hollered and rasped vocals which is sure to scare off all metal purists to their land where hard rock and metal do not associate with anything outside of that realm. However, bands like Stuck Mojo have proven that there is a large segment of the audience that can overcome that particular obstacle and naturally bands like Throe will come into existence. A Reflection of Never is a fairly decent effort that mostly tries to work with the energy of the music, as well as the anger of the lyrics, to create their sound. Little about Throe is terribly original, but they do have the tendency to toss in some quieter musical passages that allow for the music to breathe a little. "Youth of America" (not a cover of the Wipers' classic) is an example of this. As with the demo CD, the material often relies too much on simply shouting out rage and aggression over basic riffs. That particular emotion of rage can supply a certain amount of appeal but eventually the anger must turn into something productive or more introspective or you're going to lose your audience. It's good that Throe is able to include the more somber, less power chord reliant tracks like "Oblivion" next to the angrier numbers to prove they aren't a one trick pony. In the end, Throe will have to constantly reinvent themselves and their driving motivation in order to claw their way through the scads of bands also playing this style. Otherwise, they'll instantly make themselves obsolete.

Review by John Chedsey

Review date: 03/2001

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